G109 – Use medium or bold face type, e.g., Sans Serif type font,i.e., Helvetica, Arial. Avoid other fancy font types.

Standard

Guideline:

Use medium or bold face type e.g. sans serif type font i.e. Helvetica, Arial. Avoid other fancy font types.

Guideline Description:

Selecting an appropriate font type is crutial in a design of user interface for the older adults. Using sans serif fonts, such as, Arial Helvetica Century Gothic, facilitates the  reading of texts on the screen. The size of  font type should be large or preferably adjustable.

Recommended

Sans Serif:          Arial           Helvetica     Century Gothic

Size recommended for body text:  12pt or 14 pt

Avoid

Script Fonts and decorative fonts that are difficult to read.
Use of font types with serifs.

Example:

example g109Text examples using as font size, 12 and 14 points.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012
Design Recommendations for TV User Interfaces for Older Adults: Findings from the eCAALYX Project,2012


Tags:

Design, Elderly, Font Type, Layout, Reading,  Text,Vision.

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G108 – Main body of the text should be in sentence case and not all capital letters.

Standard

Guideline:

Main body of the text should be in sentence case and not all capital letters.

Guideline Description:

Writing of text should use the sentence case and avoid the use of the uppercase. Meanwhile, the uppercase can be used to draw attention of some text parts, example: UPPERCASE DRAWS ATTENTION.

Avoid:

Uppercase should not be used for long text blocks.

Example:

example g108

Example of texts using uppercase and sentence case.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012

Tags:

Design, Elderly, Layout, Reading, Text, Vision.

G107 – The text should be double spacing between the lines.

Standard

Guideline:

The text  should be double spacing between the lines.

Guideline Description:

The ideal text spacing for older adults in body text is double-spaced; this format increases the readability and legibility.

Example:

example g107_

This example shows the use of double-spaced text.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010

Tags:

Design, Elderly, Layout, Legibility, Reading, Text, Vision.

G105 – Blue and yellow or red and green tones should be avoided. Warm colors are the most suitable.

Standard

Guideline

Blue and yellow or red and green tones should be avoided. Warm colors are the most suitable.

Guideline Description:

Blue and yellow combinations should be avoided, given that many users (including the older adults and young’s) can suffer from tritanopia i.e. a visual defect that causes inability to discern blue and yellow.

Green and Red combination should also be avoided, once that many users can suffer from protanopia and deuteranopia, i.e. a visual defect  that  causes inability to perception of red and confusion of red with green.

Excluding the aspects mentioned before, the use of colors with long-wavelength end of spectrum (i.e. “warm” colors) are most perceptible than the use of short-wavelenghts (“cool” colors).

Example:

example_g105_Visible spectrum of users with protanopia, tritanopia and identification of  “warm” and “cold” colors.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012

Tags:

Colors, Content,  Elderly, Graphics, Layout, Vision.

G89 – Use a big button size.

Standard

Guideline:

Use a big button size.

Guideline Description:

The use of big button size in applications for older adults has two purposes, the first purpose serves to help people with vision impairments in noticing the button and the second purpose serves to help people with motor problems in pressing button accurately.

Some button sizes are recommended, for example a button for a finger selection is recommended at least 20 mm square, meanwhile buttons with 20mm by 31.7 mm are more appealing to users. Minimum recommended button size is 10mm, for older adults 11.43 mm, a slightly larger. Relatively the space of the buttons is recommended a space between 3.17 mm and 12.7 mm to lower performance error rates for older adults.

Example:

exemplo G89An example of an application with large buttons.

Source:

Using the Android Tablet to Develop a Game Platform for Older Adults, 2011
Touch Screens for the Older User,2011
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012
Touch Screen User Interfaces for Older Adults: ButtonSize and Spacing,2007

Tags:

Accessibility, Buttons, Content, Elderly, Large-Elements,  Motor, Vision , Target Design.

G64 – Avoid forcing users to read at very close distances.

Standard

Guideline:

Avoid forcing users to read at very close distances.

Guideline Description:

Older adults may suffer of presbyopia, characterized by a progressively diminished ability to focus on near objects. This impairment can be reduced through the use of glasses. So, for this reason do not force users to read at very close distances.

Example:

exemplo G64

An older adult with presbyopia symptoms.

Source:

Healthcare TV Based User Interfaces for Older Adults, 2010

Tags:

Cognitive, Elderly, Reading,  Testing, Vision.

G61 – Use left-aligned text.

Standard

Guideline:

Use left-aligned text.

Guideline Description:

The text alignment should be left-aligned, due to the justified text does not maintain the optimized spacing between letters and words, and the older adults are accustomed to reading left-aligned text.

Avoid:

Text justified.

Example:

exemplo G61

An example of a left-aligned text and example of a justified text.

Source:

Healthcare TV Based User Interfaces for Older Adults, 2010
Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Design Recommendations for TV User Interfaces for Older Adults: Findings from the eCAALYX Project,2012

Tags:

Alignment , Design, Elderly, Layout, Reading, Text,Vision.