G80 – Create speech that is redundant, semantically well structured.

Standard

Guideline:

Create speech that is redundant, semantically well structured.

Guideline Description:

The use of redundancy i.e. construction of a phrase that presents some idea using more information, in order to enabling the understanding of the idea transmitted and semantically well-structured phrases, increase the speech intelligibility by older adults.

Example:

exemplo G80

During a dialogue with older adults, the use of well structured and redundant messages increase speech inteligibility.

Source:

Healthcare TV Based User Interfaces for Older Adults, 2010

Tags:

Audio, Communication, Elderly, Language, Testing.

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G64 – Avoid forcing users to read at very close distances.

Standard

Guideline:

Avoid forcing users to read at very close distances.

Guideline Description:

Older adults may suffer of presbyopia, characterized by a progressively diminished ability to focus on near objects. This impairment can be reduced through the use of glasses. So, for this reason do not force users to read at very close distances.

Example:

exemplo G64

An older adult with presbyopia symptoms.

Source:

Healthcare TV Based User Interfaces for Older Adults, 2010

Tags:

Cognitive, Elderly, Reading,  Testing, Vision.

G63 – Give them time to read. Older adults usually read more slowly (than younger adults).

Standard

Guideline:

Give them time to read. Older adults usually read more slowly (than younger adults).

Guideline Description:

In general older adults have low literacy level, so they need more time to reading than younger adults. It is important to give them time to read and interpret the information presented. For example the use of popups that disappear after  certain  number  of seconds should be avoid, once  the older adult may not have the enough time to read.

Example:

exemplo G63An older adult reading elements of a nutrition application in a touch-screen device.

Source:

Healthcare TV Based User Interfaces for Older Adults, 2010
Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Design Recommendations for TV User Interfaces for Older Adults: Findings from the eCAALYX Project,2012

Tags:

Cognitive, Elderly, Reading, Testing, Time.

G60 – Allow the older adult to adjust the size of the font in the user interface.

Standard

Guideline:

Allow the older adult to adjust the size of the font in the user interface.

Guideline Description:

As different users have different visual capabilities. It is recommended that user interface has included a mechanism of adjustment for the font type according to the user preferences.

Example

examplo G60

An example of a mechanism of font type adjustment.

Source:

Healthcare TV Based User Interfaces for Older Adults, 2010
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012

Tags:

Accessibility, Adaptability, Elderly, Font Type, Testing, Text.

G53 – Don’t forget older adults did not grow up using computers, “the odds are stacked against them”.

Standard

Guideline:

Don’t forget older adults did not grow up using computers, “the odds are stacked against them”.

Guideline Description:

The older adults did not grown using computers, for this reason, in general they have difficulties in using them and consequently they are not familiar with many metaphors used in these systems.

Example:

examplo G53

An older adult using a computer.

Source:

Healthcare TV Based User Interfaces for Older Adults, 2010

Tags:

Cognitive, Computer, Elderly, Learnability, User Experience, Testing

G52 – Make use of behaviors developed by older adults to cope with memory loss.

Standard

Guideline:

Make use of behaviors developed by older adults to cope with memory loss.

Guideline Description:

Losing of memory essentially the short-term memory, implies the use of some mechanisms to remembering, for example, note-taking. The use of these mechanisms should be encouraged.

Example:

examplo G52

An older adult taking notes during the use of a computer.

Source:

Healthcare TV Based User Interfaces for Older Adults, 2010

Tags:

Cognitive, Elderly, Memory, Testing.