G110 – Error messages should be simple and easy to follow.

Standard

Guideline:

Error messages should be simple and easy to follow.

Guideline Description:

In the presence of an error, the system should describe the occurrence explaining how to recover, without blaming the user by  this situation, once older adults are more prone to blame themselves for errors, because they  have low experience with technology. Their motor skills also influence the occurrence of errors. The language employed in the error messages should be understandable by older adults.

Avoid:

Unclear error messages.
Using of inappropriate language.

Example:

example g110

A good example of an error message.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Design Recommendations for TV User Interfaces for Older Adults: Findings from the eCAALYX Project,2012

Tags:

Elderly, Errors, Feedback, Motor, Navigation

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G100 – Avoid repetitive actions

Standard

Guideline:

Avoid repetitive actions

Guideline Description:

The older adults may suffer of physical impairments causing a diminished of motor capabilities in particular stiffening of the joints and arthritis, reducing the ability to cope with fast repetitive movements. Due to this factor repetitive actions should be avoid.

Example:

example _ g100The movement of the objects A, B, C from container 1 to container 2 is an example of a repetitive task.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010

Tags:

Design,Elderly, Interaction, Motor, Navigation

G89 – Use a big button size.

Standard

Guideline:

Use a big button size.

Guideline Description:

The use of big button size in applications for older adults has two purposes, the first purpose serves to help people with vision impairments in noticing the button and the second purpose serves to help people with motor problems in pressing button accurately.

Some button sizes are recommended, for example a button for a finger selection is recommended at least 20 mm square, meanwhile buttons with 20mm by 31.7 mm are more appealing to users. Minimum recommended button size is 10mm, for older adults 11.43 mm, a slightly larger. Relatively the space of the buttons is recommended a space between 3.17 mm and 12.7 mm to lower performance error rates for older adults.

Example:

exemplo G89An example of an application with large buttons.

Source:

Using the Android Tablet to Develop a Game Platform for Older Adults, 2011
Touch Screens for the Older User,2011
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012
Touch Screen User Interfaces for Older Adults: ButtonSize and Spacing,2007

Tags:

Accessibility, Buttons, Content, Elderly, Large-Elements,  Motor, Vision , Target Design.

G69 – Avoid the use of scroll.

Standard

Guideline:

Avoid the use of scroll.

Guideline Description:

Conventional user interfaces  resort often  use  of  scrolling  to  display  content  that  cannot  be displayed  on one screen. In  touch-screen interfaces used by the elders this technique should be avoid, not only by their declining working memory that may cause the losing of the context of the task but also because using scroll bars implies hand-eye coordination may be difficult to performing by some older users.

Example:

exemplo G69

An example of scrolling use in a touch-screen interface that should be avoid.

Source:

Healthcare TV Based User Interfaces for Older Adults,2010
Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Touch Screens for the Older User,2011
Design Recommendations for TV User Interfaces for Older Adults: Findings from the eCAALYX Project,2012

Tags:

Content, Elderly,Layout, Memory, Motor, Screen, Scrolling, Windows.

G43 – Different physical properties have to be considered while designing the interface (e.g. size of buttons).

Standard

Guideline:

Different  physical  properties have  to  be  considered  while  designing  the  interface  (e.g. size  of  buttons).

Guideline Description:

Different users have different physical characteristics.  The different  physical  properties should be considered  in the design of the  interface  (e.g. size  of  buttons).

Example:

examplo G43

An example of a touch-screen interface, with large buttons.

Source:

Challenges for Designing the User Experience of  Multi-touch Interfaces, 2010
Touch Screens for the Older User,2011
Touch Screen User Interfaces for Older Adults: Button Size and Spacing,2007

Tags:

Buttons,Challenge,Content, Elderly, Layout,Motor, Multi-touch, Target Design.

G42 – It is necessary that interface elements do not are covered by fingers, hands or arms during the interaction.

Standard

Guideline:

It is necessary that interface elements do not are covered by fingers, hands or arms during the interaction.

Guideline Description:

The partial occlusion of the screen caused by fingers, hands and arms when users interacting with surface are an aspect that should be into account in the design of a multi-touch interface. So, the design of interface should avoid occlusions that affecting the interaction, and the hand and arm movements should be considered in the placing the elements in the user interface, in order to prevent early muscle fatigue.

Example:

example_guideline42

Examples of finger occluding pie menu.

Source:

Challenges for Designing the User Experience of  Multi-touch Interfaces, 2010

Tags:

Challenge, Interface, Interaction, Layout, Motor, Multi-touch,  Overlap.

G26 – Do not ask them to move.

Standard

Guideline:

Do not ask them to move.

Guideline Description:

Older adults suffer of motor impairments that may affect their ability to move. During the testing sessions the older adults should not be forced to walk, especially long distances.

Example:

examplo G26

An older adult walking using a cane to maintain his stability.

Source:

3 x 7 Usability Testing Guidelines for Older Adults,2010

Tags:

Communication, Elderly, Motor, Testing.