G113 – Minimize the number of steps it takes to reach a given screen.

Standard

Guideline:

Minimize the number of steps it takes to reach a given screen.

Guideline Description:

The steps should be simple and number of steps needed to achieve a given screen should be minimized, fostering a good navigation. An useful way of presentation is through of the use of a hierarchy and grouping of information into meaningful categories, focusing only the most relevant items.

Avoid

Complex, multi-step process.
Procedures inconsistent with established practice.
A deep hierarchy.

Example

example g113Examples of well-designed hierarchy menus.

Illustration adapted from Design Recommendations for TV User Interfaces for Older Adults: Findings from the eCAALYX Project

Source:
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012
Design Recommendations for TV User Interfaces for Older Adults: Findings from the eCAALYX Project,2012

Tags: Content, Elderly, Layout,  Memory, Navigation, Screen

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G112 – Avoid note taking or scribble functions.

Standard

Guideline:
Avoid note taking or scribble functions.

Guideline Description:

The use of note taking or scribble functions should be avoid. This technique reduces the legibility.

Example

example g112Example of an application using handwriting.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010

Tags:

Design, Elderly, Layout, Legibility, Multi-Touch

G109 – Use medium or bold face type, e.g., Sans Serif type font,i.e., Helvetica, Arial. Avoid other fancy font types.

Standard

Guideline:

Use medium or bold face type e.g. sans serif type font i.e. Helvetica, Arial. Avoid other fancy font types.

Guideline Description:

Selecting an appropriate font type is crutial in a design of user interface for the older adults. Using sans serif fonts, such as, Arial Helvetica Century Gothic, facilitates the  reading of texts on the screen. The size of  font type should be large or preferably adjustable.

Recommended

Sans Serif:          Arial           Helvetica     Century Gothic

Size recommended for body text:  12pt or 14 pt

Avoid

Script Fonts and decorative fonts that are difficult to read.
Use of font types with serifs.

Example:

example g109Text examples using as font size, 12 and 14 points.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012
Design Recommendations for TV User Interfaces for Older Adults: Findings from the eCAALYX Project,2012


Tags:

Design, Elderly, Font Type, Layout, Reading,  Text,Vision.

G108 – Main body of the text should be in sentence case and not all capital letters.

Standard

Guideline:

Main body of the text should be in sentence case and not all capital letters.

Guideline Description:

Writing of text should use the sentence case and avoid the use of the uppercase. Meanwhile, the uppercase can be used to draw attention of some text parts, example: UPPERCASE DRAWS ATTENTION.

Avoid:

Uppercase should not be used for long text blocks.

Example:

example g108

Example of texts using uppercase and sentence case.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012

Tags:

Design, Elderly, Layout, Reading, Text, Vision.

G107 – The text should be double spacing between the lines.

Standard

Guideline:

The text  should be double spacing between the lines.

Guideline Description:

The ideal text spacing for older adults in body text is double-spaced; this format increases the readability and legibility.

Example:

example g107_

This example shows the use of double-spaced text.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010

Tags:

Design, Elderly, Layout, Legibility, Reading, Text, Vision.

G106 – Background screens should not be pure white or change rapidly in brightness between screens.

Standard

Guideline:

Background screens should not be pure white or change rapidly in brightness between screens.

Guideline Description:

Aging process brings some visual impairments. Reading text  on a computer can represent an difficult task. The older users not only have difficult to read characters too small but also standard white screen can hamper this task. Older adults also adapt more slowly to changes in illumination, so the rapidly changes  in brightness between screens should be avoided.

Example:

example_g106_

Some examples of colors combination to avoid, and a good example of colors combination.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010

Tags:

Colors, Content, Elderly, Graphics, Layout, Screen.

G105 – Blue and yellow or red and green tones should be avoided. Warm colors are the most suitable.

Standard

Guideline

Blue and yellow or red and green tones should be avoided. Warm colors are the most suitable.

Guideline Description:

Blue and yellow combinations should be avoided, given that many users (including the older adults and young’s) can suffer from tritanopia i.e. a visual defect that causes inability to discern blue and yellow.

Green and Red combination should also be avoided, once that many users can suffer from protanopia and deuteranopia, i.e. a visual defect  that  causes inability to perception of red and confusion of red with green.

Excluding the aspects mentioned before, the use of colors with long-wavelength end of spectrum (i.e. “warm” colors) are most perceptible than the use of short-wavelenghts (“cool” colors).

Example:

example_g105_Visible spectrum of users with protanopia, tritanopia and identification of  “warm” and “cold” colors.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012

Tags:

Colors, Content,  Elderly, Graphics, Layout, Vision.