G111 – Avoid some gestures in the multi-touch interaction.

Standard

Guideline:

Avoid some gestures in the multi-touch interaction

Guideline Description:

The use of some  gestures in the multi-touch interaction can be difficult to performing by the older adults, namely the most complex gestures, due to  some physical changes associated with the aging. Rotate gesture is an example of a difficult to perform gesture.

Example:

g111-example1

Elders using rotate gesture during a testing session.

Illustration adapted from Exploring the Accessibility and Appeal of Surface Computing for Older Adult Health Care Support

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Exploring the Accessibility and Appeal of Surface Computing for Older Adult Health Care Support,2010
Tabletop Sharing of Digital Photographs for the Elderly,2006
Touch Panel Usability of Elderly and Children, 2014

Tags:

Accessibility, Elderly, Gestures, Interaction, Multi-touch

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G45 – Gestures in use are increasingly becoming inconsistent across different manufacturers, it is necessary to define a standard gestures.

Standard

Guideline:

Gestures in use are increasingly becoming inconsistent across different manufacturers, it is necessary to define a standard gestures.

Guideline Description:

The lacks of standard of gestures make with the gestures in use are increasingly becoming inconsistent across different manufacturers. The creation of standard gestures is also difficult to achieve due to the patents that protect specific gestures for a manufacturer.

Example:

examplo G45

An example of a set of gestures used by a manufacturer.

Source:

Challenges for Designing the User Experience of  Multi-touch Interfaces, 2010

Tags:

Challenge, Gestures,  Multi-touch, Standard.

G14 – The rate at which virtual objects adjust based on subtle hand movements, particularly during resizing and rotating actions, needs to be slowed down.

Standard

Guideline:

The rate at which virtual objects adjust based on subtle hand movements, particularly during resizing and rotating actions, needs to be slowed down.

Guideline Description:

The performing of some gestures, for example resize gesture and rotate gesture should be accompanied with some slowed down in the correspondence of these gestures with interface objects.  The multi-touch interfaces for older adults should include easing or damping in the interaction.

Example:

example_g14This example illustrates the use of resize gesture whose its correspondence with interface objects should be slowed down.

Source:

Exploring the Accessibility and Appeal of Surface Computing for Older Adult Health Care Support,2010
Touch Screens for the Older User,2011

Tags:

Accessibility, Elderly, Feedback, Gestures, Interaction, Multi-Touch.

G6 – Due to large variability in touch performance by elderly people (due to age, health-related issue, etc.) the setting of the time parameters of gestures is of paramount importance, to promote a better adaptation.

Standard

Guideline:

Due to large variability in touch performance by elderly people (due to age, health-related issue, etc.) the setting of the time parameters of gestures is of paramount importance, to promote a better adaptation.

Guideline Description:

The setting of the time parameters of gestures is a crutial feature, in order to promote a better adaptability of the interface, due to a large variability in touch performance by elderly people (due to age, health-related issue, etc.).

Example:

example_g6

This example illustrates the setting of  time response of the gestures.

Source:

An Exploratory Study of a Touch-Based Gestural Interface for Elderly,2010

Tags:

Accessibility, Adaptability, Elderly, Gestures, Interaction, Multi-touch, Time, User Experience

G5 – Iconic gestures are very engaging.

Standard

Guideline:

Iconic gestures are very engaging.

Guideline Description:

An iconic gesture is a gesture that visually and analogically represents its meaning; these gestures  have a hedonic quality that are enjoyed by older users.  Example: ‘X’ gesture , ‘L’ gesture.

Example:

example_g5

“X” gesture and “L” gesture are examples of iconic gestures.

Source:

An Exploratory Study of a Touch-Based Gestural Interface for Elderly,2010

Tags:

Accessibility, Elderly, Gestures, Interaction, Multi-touch

G4 – In drag gestures, the “natural” version should be implemented: the object should stay where it has been left rather than flying back to its initial position.

Standard

Guideline:

In drag gestures, the “natural” version should be implemented: the object should stay where it has been left rather than flying back to its initial position.

Guideline Description:

In the use of drag gesture in the manipulation of an interface, the “natural” version of this gesture should be implemented, i.e. when the contact is lost during a drag the object should stay where it has been left, does not coming back to its initial position.

Example:

example_g4In this example if the object is dropped during the drag gesture the object does not comes back
to initial position, staying where it has been left.

Source:

An Exploratory Study of a Touch-Based Gestural Interface for Elderly,2010

Tags:

Accessibility, Elderly,  Gestures, Interaction, Multi-touch

G3 – Do not overload the same object with actions performed by a tap and by a drag gesture.

Standard

Guideline:

Do not overload the same object with actions performed by a tap and by a drag gesture.

Guideline Description:

The same object should not be overlapping with actions performed by a tap and by a drag gesture. In case of insufficient pressure or of false starts these two gestures may be easily confused.

Example:

example_g3

Example of an object with overload of tap gesture and drag gesture.

Source:

An Exploratory Study of a Touch-Based Gestural Interface for Elderly,2010

Tags:

Accessibility, Content, Elderly, Gestures, Interaction,  Layout, Multi-touch, Overlap