G111 – Avoid some gestures in the multi-touch interaction.

Standard

Guideline:

Avoid some gestures in the multi-touch interaction

Guideline Description:

The use of some  gestures in the multi-touch interaction can be difficult to performing by the older adults, namely the most complex gestures, due to  some physical changes associated with the aging. Rotate gesture is an example of a difficult to perform gesture.

Example:

g111-example1

Elders using rotate gesture during a testing session.

Illustration adapted from Exploring the Accessibility and Appeal of Surface Computing for Older Adult Health Care Support

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Exploring the Accessibility and Appeal of Surface Computing for Older Adult Health Care Support,2010
Tabletop Sharing of Digital Photographs for the Elderly,2006
Touch Panel Usability of Elderly and Children, 2014

Tags:

Accessibility, Elderly, Gestures, Interaction, Multi-touch

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G89 – Use a big button size.

Standard

Guideline:

Use a big button size.

Guideline Description:

The use of big button size in applications for older adults has two purposes, the first purpose serves to help people with vision impairments in noticing the button and the second purpose serves to help people with motor problems in pressing button accurately.

Some button sizes are recommended, for example a button for a finger selection is recommended at least 20 mm square, meanwhile buttons with 20mm by 31.7 mm are more appealing to users. Minimum recommended button size is 10mm, for older adults 11.43 mm, a slightly larger. Relatively the space of the buttons is recommended a space between 3.17 mm and 12.7 mm to lower performance error rates for older adults.

Example:

exemplo G89An example of an application with large buttons.

Source:

Using the Android Tablet to Develop a Game Platform for Older Adults, 2011
Touch Screens for the Older User,2011
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012
Touch Screen User Interfaces for Older Adults: ButtonSize and Spacing,2007

Tags:

Accessibility, Buttons, Content, Elderly, Large-Elements,  Motor, Vision , Target Design.

G75 – Enable older adults to adjust the volume at their will.

Standard

Guideline:

Enable older adults to adjust the volume at their will.

Guideline Description:

In a user interface, a presence of an adjustment mechanism of the audio volume is crucial, in order to adjusting the volume according to audio user capabilities.

Example:

example guideline g75An example of volume adjustment in a interface.

Source:

Healthcare TV Based User Interfaces for Older Adults, 2010
Touch Screens for the Older User,2011
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012

Tags:

Accessibility, Adaptability, Audio, Elderly.

G68 – Use icons along with labels. Icons should be simple and meaningful; text incorporated with the icon when possible.

Standard

Guideline:

Use icons along with labels. Icons should be simple and meaningful; text incorporated with the icon when possible.

Guideline Description:

The use of symbolic icons helps in the use of applications by older adults, essentially the older adults that present problems in reading. For better design it is recommended the use of simple and meaningful icons, followed by some text whenever possible.

Example:

exemplo G68

An example of an application with labels and icons in hte buttons.

Source:
Healthcare TV Based User Interfaces for Older Adults, 2010
Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012
Design Recommendations for TV User Interfaces for Older Adults: Findings from the eCAALYX Project,2012

Tags:

Accessibility,Content, Elderly, Graphics, Icons, Layout.

G60 – Allow the older adult to adjust the size of the font in the user interface.

Standard

Guideline:

Allow the older adult to adjust the size of the font in the user interface.

Guideline Description:

As different users have different visual capabilities. It is recommended that user interface has included a mechanism of adjustment for the font type according to the user preferences.

Example

examplo G60

An example of a mechanism of font type adjustment.

Source:

Healthcare TV Based User Interfaces for Older Adults, 2010
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012

Tags:

Accessibility, Adaptability, Elderly, Font Type, Testing, Text.

G56 – Reduce the demand on working memory by and supporting recognition rather than recall provide fewer choices to the user.

Standard

Guideline:

Reduce the demand on working memory by supporting recognition rather than recall and provide fewer choices to the user.

Guideline Description:

In general, normal aging process declines working-memory, due to this factor it is important designing for recognition than recall, in order to reducing these identified limitations. Presenting similar contents in the same way is recommend in the design of the user interface, for example in the menus.

Example:

example g56

Similar appearance in the menus promotes  recognition rather than recall.

Illustration adapted from Design Recommendations for TV User Interfaces for Older Adults: Findings from the eCAALYX Project

Source:

Healthcare TV Based User Interfaces for Older Adults, 2010
Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Design Recommendations for TV User Interfaces for Older Adults: Findings from the eCAALYX Project,2012

Tags:

Accessibility, Cognitive, Elderly, Interaction, Memory, Recognition,  User Experience.

G44 – Accessibility issues should be taken into account, for example giving tools to allow the use by blind people.

Standard

Guideline:

Accessibility issues should be taken into account, for example giving tools to allow the use by blind people.

Guideline Description:

Blind and visually impaired people face barriers when interacting with touch screens. Due to this factor, tools for this type of people should be provided in order to attenuate this limitation, for example through screen readers.

Example:

examplo G44

VoiceOver is an example of a screen reader.

Source:

Challenges for Designing the User Experience of  Multi-touch Interfaces, 2010

Tags:

Accessibility,Challenge, Multi-Touch, Support, Vision.