G106 – Background screens should not be pure white or change rapidly in brightness between screens.

Standard

Guideline:

Background screens should not be pure white or change rapidly in brightness between screens.

Guideline Description:

Aging process brings some visual impairments. Reading text  on a computer can represent an difficult task. The older users not only have difficult to read characters too small but also standard white screen can hamper this task. Older adults also adapt more slowly to changes in illumination, so the rapidly changes  in brightness between screens should be avoided.

Example:

example_g106_

Some examples of colors combination to avoid, and a good example of colors combination.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010

Tags:

Colors, Content, Elderly, Graphics, Layout, Screen.

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G105 – Blue and yellow or red and green tones should be avoided. Warm colors are the most suitable.

Standard

Guideline

Blue and yellow or red and green tones should be avoided. Warm colors are the most suitable.

Guideline Description:

Blue and yellow combinations should be avoided, given that many users (including the older adults and young’s) can suffer from tritanopia i.e. a visual defect that causes inability to discern blue and yellow.

Green and Red combination should also be avoided, once that many users can suffer from protanopia and deuteranopia, i.e. a visual defect  that  causes inability to perception of red and confusion of red with green.

Excluding the aspects mentioned before, the use of colors with long-wavelength end of spectrum (i.e. “warm” colors) are most perceptible than the use of short-wavelenghts (“cool” colors).

Example:

example_g105_Visible spectrum of users with protanopia, tritanopia and identification of  “warm” and “cold” colors.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012

Tags:

Colors, Content,  Elderly, Graphics, Layout, Vision.

G104 – Language should be simple, clear, uses the active voice and uses positive phrasing.

Standard

Guideline:

Language should be simple, clear, uses the active voice and uses positive phrasing.


Guideline Description:

The use of simple language  in a user interface for older adults, is important for a good understanding, otherwise they may have difficulties in the interpretation.

Example:

example g104An user interface example with simple language.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010
Design Principles to Accommodate Older Adults,2012
Design Recommendations for TV User Interfaces for Older Adults: Findings from the eCAALYX Project,2012

Tags:

Communication, Content, Elderly, Design,  Language, Layout.

G103 – Provide only one open window e.g. pop up or multiple overlapping windows should be avoided.

Standard

Guideline:

Provide only one open window e.g. pop up or multiple overlapping windows should be avoided.

Guideline Description:

The use of a single window eases the interaction. The use of multiple overlapping windows hampers the interaction, so this technique should be avoid.

Example:

example guideline g103A good example with single window, and example of windows overlapping that should be avoid.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010

Tags:

Content, Elderly, Layout, Overlap, Screen, Windows

G102 – Do not have a deep hierarchy and group information into meaningful categories

Standard

Guideline:

Do not have a deep hierarchy and group information into meaningful categories.

Guideline Description:

The use of a deep hierarchy to show information in the interface is not recommended for older adults, however  the use of a hierarchy with essential elements can be considered. The information should be grouped using meaningful categories giving obvious navigation cues.

Example:

example g102

An example of an user interface using meaningful categories giving obvious navigation cues.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010

Tags:

Content, Elderly, Layout, Memory,Navigation

G101 – Extra and bolder navigation cues should be provided.

Standard

Guideline:

Extra and bolder navigation cues should be provided.

Guideline Description:

The existence of extra and bolder navigation cues facilitates the use of the interface by older users.

Example:

example g101The identification of option selected in the menu provides a bolder cue of interaction.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010

Tags:

Elderly, Interaction, Multi-Touch, Navigation.

G100 – Avoid repetitive actions

Standard

Guideline:

Avoid repetitive actions

Guideline Description:

The older adults may suffer of physical impairments causing a diminished of motor capabilities in particular stiffening of the joints and arthritis, reducing the ability to cope with fast repetitive movements. Due to this factor repetitive actions should be avoid.

Example:

example _ g100The movement of the objects A, B, C from container 1 to container 2 is an example of a repetitive task.

Source:

Designing touch-based interfaces for the elderly,2010

Tags:

Design,Elderly, Interaction, Motor, Navigation